Putting The Cover On

Barry and the crew put the cover on today, the white plastic shrink wrap that the Mary Day wears for the winter. All spars were brought inboard, a framework was set up, plastic hoops were strapped onto the framework. Then today, white plastic was rolled out and stretched over the hoops, then all gaps and joints were severely taped in place. Then Barry fired up his torch: an oversized hair dryer powered by a propane tank. You can see the heat in that picture to the right (click to see it larger). When he gets done with a section, it’s drum-tight, ready for most of what the winter brings.

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6 comments

  1. Mary Day is all snug in her bed ready for a long winter. Here in Alabama my plan is to finally finish painting my boat next Tuesday and weather willing launch her Friday and spend the weekend learning how to sail a little dinghy.

    If she floats and I don't drown pictures will follow.

  2. Thanks for the fine and informative pictures. The background activities of running a schooner always interest me.

    It's nice, also, to see a picture of two of my favorite deck hands. I hope all of your fine crew will be aboard next year. They treat us and their fine ship with cheerful attention and skill.

  3. Ed, whatever happens, please send us a blog note to let us know you are ok. Otherwise, if we don't hear from you, we may fear the worst. :0

    I hope your boat floats and pictures will soon be coming our way.

  4. Michele B – Thanks for your concern. I do expect the boat to float, after more than a year of gluing, screwing (wood screws), installing breast hooks, stern knees, oarlock sockets, and thwarts then sanding, forming, shaping spars, and more recently sanding, varnishing, sanding and bronze wool buffing, sanding painting and sanding, installing the rudder hardware, getting the Alabama Marine Police to inspect the boat and assign a hull number, rigging the sail, building a trailer so I can haul it around, and then getting a state registration number, it d***n well better float. And did I mention sanding?

    How was that for a run-on sentence?

    For pictures of the progress from the delivery of the kit from Wooden Boat to the early stages of painting see my Picasa.

  5. Thanks for the pictures, Ed. Wow, that's a lot of work. She is a beautiful little boat! Have you thought of a name for her yet? I wish you many years of good sailing. 🙂

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