Category Archives: nature tours in maine

Life in the Balance

I have photographed this piece of granite a thousand times. I captured this image on the last cruise of the 2019 season knowing for sure that the winter ice and cold temperatures would most likely roll this over the edge. I have been thinking this for the last 40 years since I first saw this rock.

I can’t be the only one who marvels at how precariously this rock is perched. There it is…seemingly all alone. And that is where this story gets interesting during these times of social distancing. We could quickly label this a glacial erratic but it isn’t really an erratic in the truest sense of the term. The boulder, while undoubtedly deposited during a period of glacial activity sometime before last Tuesday, is composed of the same granite as the surrounding landscape. Often the term erratic is used to describe glacially transported rocks of different composition than the surrounding landscape. There is an excellent example on the southeast side of Mark I off of Camden. I wish I had a picture of that to share. But don’t take my word for it. Come sailing so I can show it to you.

Fasten your seatbelts and hang with me for another moment. The beauty of the times we are living in is our ability to stay connected electronically. The challenge is to stay connected physically, emotionally, spiritually. Electronic communication is woefully inadequate as we strive for the fulfilling soul food of physical, emotional, and spiritual connection. It is all too easy to find ourselves feeling alone when in truth we are being supported by the very bedrock from which we derive our psychological existence. My heart aches when I think of how social distancing is making us feel isolated, maybe even unloved. Reaching out through email and text may be the best we can do for the moment. So I want you to print out my picture. When you look at this picture I want you to remember that you are loved and supported by the basic bedrock of your friends, family, and community.

So there you have it. If windjamming does nothing else, it allows me to unplug and take a moment to re-connect with the natural world. Ultimately I am actually re-connecting with my friends and neighbors. Friendships forged aboard the schooner while watching sunsets and bald eagles and beautiful scenery last a long time. So many of our guests keep coming back to see each other. They stay connected through the 51 weeks of the year they are not aboard. Take a moment today to shoot a very quick email or text or postcard to someone, anyone. Be the bedrock that supports the delicate balance in which we find ourselves living.

Have a great day. You are not alone. Be safe. Be well. Do good.

50 miles away and still at home

maine windjammer, schooner, schooner cruises, maine windjammers, windjammer cruisesGood morning everyone. We had a spectacular sail yesterday, our first day of the season’s first 6 day cruise, Puffins and the War of 1812. By days end we had 50 miles under our keel since departing from Camden and were treated to a beautiful sunset over Acadia National Park and Mt Desert. Along the way we had the pleasure of sailing close alongside the schooner Heritage. The sun light dancing on the water and graceful sheer of her rail kept all the cameras aboard Mary Day quite busy while we circumnavigated her port and starboard sides, stern and bow. They had their cameras pointing our way as well. I hope we get a chance to exchange images sometime.
Lighthouses and Acadia National Park
Anchored here at Little Cranberry Island, the small community of Islesford calls to be explored. I have been here many many times over the past 30 years but I never get enough. It feels like home to be anchored here. Guests are heading ashore right now to hike to the back beach where the tide washed-stones sing their clickety clack song to the waves. The small artists shops are not quite ready for our early arrival. I encouraged folks to visit the small church where light filtering through stained glass warms the soul. A skirmish occurred here in Hadlock Cove during the War of 1812 between the US and British. I have ordered the crew to take to the small boats to allow a reenactment for the guests, water balloons for armament. I am mindful of how blessed we are to be in this beautiful place with such good company and a view from the office window that can’t be beat.

Have a great day. Be well. Do good.

Go Big, Go Windjammin’

maine windjammers cruisesGood afternoon everybody. So as you can see I have a new toy, a GoPro camera so get yourselves ready for some new perspectives on windjamming. The 170 degree field of view is fun and certainly gives folks the big picture. The movie mode is awesome. Don’t think you won’t be seeing some cool footage from the bow while we are out sailing. Of course there are quite a few pixels in this tiny little box so it will take some gezhuntering to get it right. It is fun to see the world through the lens of a new camera. As Jim Dugan always preaches on our Nature/Photography Cruises some of the coolest pictures are those that are taken from perspectives from which we do not normally see life. And isn’t that just a great message for the day, eh?

windjammer cruises in MaineEnjoy these. The smiling glasses gal is Morgan, deckhand extraordinaire aboard Mary Day this summer. The figure head would be Brendan who is helping fit-out the Lewis R French. And Amber is hanging cat like on the cat head painting that cute little star. Nice touch!

Have a great day. Be well. Do good.

maine windjammer